The Importance of Down Time

May 6, 2014

The Importance of Down Time

If you are driven to succeed in business and love what you do for a living, you may find it difficult to stop and take some down time. I know I do. It has been my mantra that if I am not performing a home inspection, I am working on the business. And, because I love what we do, I find it difficult to “turn it off” and have some down time. Time to do something other than work in my chosen profession.

Although somehow painful at first, I am finding that taking even a few hours off from work re-energizes me and clears my mind. I have learned that taking a few hours off or even a day off brings me focus, concentration and renewed energy to do what I do at my best. I am also betting that there are some health benefits as well.

For me, Sunday has become my day of rest. Years ago, I thought, “not working on Sunday, what a waste of time.” One day I realized, even God rested on the seventh day. Since we are made in His image, we should do the same. We stay busy with full home inspection schedules most of the time, even Saturdays. So Sunday is my down day to spend going to church, being with my family and doing things other than business. Even during the week now, I have learned to take short breaks and do something other than work in our business.

At first, I felt guilty, like I was being lazy. But after a while, I began to see that with small breaks from work, when I return to work I am much more focused and productive. After taking a break, the quantity and quality of work are also improved.

The saying that “all work and no play makes Jack a dull boy” now rings true. So my advice to you is if you want to improve your business and work, take some down time. Your business, family and health will thank you.

 

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Buying A Home From The Home Inspectors Perspective

September 2, 2010

Buying A Home From The Home Inspectors Perspective

If you are considering buying a home, you will soon discover that there are an overwhelming number of companies out there clamoring for your attention. Everyone in the real estate industry has something to sell or something to profit from regarding your interest in purchasing real estate. For homeowners wanting to sell, to banks wanting to unload REO properties, to agents wanting to help you find the perfect home (which does not exist), to contractors, insurance agents and, Professional Home Inspectors like me.

Dallas Home Inspection

  • Why do I want to buy a home
  • Where do I want to live
  • What can I afford
  • What financing do I qualify for
  • Should I buy a newly constructed home
  • Should I buy a foreclosed home
  • Should I buy an older home
  • Can I afford to maintenance on a home
  • Do I want a house or a condo
  • How do I choose a Realtor
  • What about a home inspection
  • Can I get a home warranty
  • Suburbs, inner city or rural
  • What can I get for my money
  • How do I sell my current home

While I can not answer all of these real estate questions for you, as a Professional North Texas Home Inspector, I can shed some light on what to expect when considering various kinds of properties such as new construction, foreclosures, older homes and rural properties.

David Selman
Advanced Professional Inspector
Lic.# 10299
FHA/HUD # F537
Septic License #113423
Phone: 469-371-3228

Email: david@SelmanHomeInspections.com

“Accurate Investment Protection You Can Trust”

Websites: Dallas Home Inspection | Fort Worth Home Inspection



Home Inspector Similarities To Realtors

March 29, 2010

Home Inspector Similarities To Realtors

In many ways, home inspectors and real estate agents are similar. Like real estate agents, home inspectors are professionals and are deserving of respect for our expertise. And, in every profession, there are those who are professional and good at what they do just like there are those who are not so professional or good at what they do. Those who are good and demonstrate professionalism last in the business they choose while others do not.

Like real estate agents, Home Inspectors are businessmen and professionals. Professional Home Inspectors operate a real business day in and day out. They have overhead expenses like professional fees, association dues, continuing education costs, marketing costs, insurance costs and expenses for tools, equipment, office supplies and vehicles. Just like any business owner, home inspectors must make prudent spending choices to operate a successful business.

Home Inspection professionals market themselves in much the same ways as Realtors do. We work from lead generation, agents referrals, public referrals, websites, social media and every other conceivable form of human contact. Our company names are on our vehicles and like real estate agents, we are always quick to hand out a business card to anyone we meet. So, like real estate, the home inspection business is a “people” business. To be successful, we have to be salesmen and foster good relationships.

Texas is among the most difficult of all states to obtain a Professional Home Inspection license (Some states do not require licensing or any regulation). Like real estate agents, home inspectors are either formally trained and mentored for 18 months or longer, or, they obtain a formal education and experience. Then after months of study they may or may not pass the state exam. I have been told that only 1 out of every 18 who take the exam pass it the first time they take it and only 2 out of 12 pass it the second time. The test can only be taken 3 times in six months. After that, the odds are even worse. Each time a home inspection exam is failed, the testing system focuses on the weakness the prospective inspector had on the last exam. Like a real estate license, the Professional Home Inspector license is difficult to earn.

Real Estate agencies and Home Inspection companies both find that their websites, blogs and online social media (Facebook) are more important than ever to business success. Today, many Home Inspectors and Realtors get more leads and customers from online sources than anywhere else. The internet has truly become where we find everything and everyone.

Home Inspections are hard work. The average home inspection takes about 4 hours at the home site, sometimes more. Inspectors cover every square foot of a structure. From the foundations and crawl spaces to the attic and roof covering, we see it all. We test every mechanical component, evaluate plumbing and vent systems and can identify 1000’s of potential hazards and problems both seen and unseen. Like Realtors, Home Inspectors must know what to look for depending on the age of the structure, the builder, current building codes and the Texas Standards of Practice for Professional Home Inspectors. Then like a real estate agent writing a sales contract, we must write a legal, state certified, home inspection reports based on the findings. It is technical and, it is hard work.

David Selman
Advanced Professional Inspector
Lic.# 10299
FHA/HUD # F537
Septic License #113423
Phone: 469-371-3228

Email: david@SelmanHomeInspections.com

“Accurate Investment Protection You Can Trust”

Websites: Dallas Home Inspection | Fort Worth Home Inspection



Realtor Top Criticisms of Home Inspection Companies – Part 3

March 18, 2010

Realtor Top Criticisms of Home Inspection Companies – Part 3

#3.) Inspectors Don’t Put Things Back The Way They Found Them

There is a very simple fix for the third top criticism Realtors have of home inspectors. Leave it like you found it. If it was closed, close it when you are done. If it was locked, lock it when you leave. If it was on, leave it on when you leave. You get the idea.

When I was a boy scout leader, we had a motto, “Leave No Trace”. When we went camping, is was our belief that after we left, there should be no trace, no sign that we had ever been there. As a professional home inspector, I continue to keep this value and believe that all inspectors should as well. Except for perhaps a business card left on the kitchen counter, I work hard to make sure that everything is left the way I found it, including the HVAC thermostat.

As home inspectors, we inspect all kinds of homes. Some are vacant and many still have current owners living in them. When we disturb things in someones home, we should put them back the way we found them. Having a stranger go through your home and leave things out of place can leave a feeling of violation that “someone has been in my house”. Not a comfortable feeling for anyone.

Personally, I live on a small farm and have also enjoyed hunting and fishing on the properties of many others. There is always one important rule. If the gate is open, leave it open. If the gate is closed, leave it closed. Although the homes we inspect are not likely to let out any livestock, we may be guilty of letting someone’s dog or cat out. More to the point, it is important for professional home inspectors to leave people homes exactly as they were before we performed our inspection.

So, it is simple. Home Inspectors should “Leave No Trace”. Proof that an inspector was there should only be evident by the home inspection report and perhaps a business card left behind. This is an easy criticism of home inspectors that should be easy to overcome.

Remember, be professional and “Leave No Trace”.

David Selman
Advanced Professional Inspector
Lic.# 10299
FHA/HUD # F537
Septic License #113423
Phone: 469-371-3228

Email: david@SelmanHomeInspections.com

“Accurate Investment Protection You Can Trust”

Websites: Dallas Home Inspection | Fort Worth Home Inspection



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