The Importance of Down Time

May 6, 2014

The Importance of Down Time

If you are driven to succeed in business and love what you do for a living, you may find it difficult to stop and take some down time. I know I do. It has been my mantra that if I am not performing a home inspection, I am working on the business. And, because I love what we do, I find it difficult to “turn it off” and have some down time. Time to do something other than work in my chosen profession.

Although somehow painful at first, I am finding that taking even a few hours off from work re-energizes me and clears my mind. I have learned that taking a few hours off or even a day off brings me focus, concentration and renewed energy to do what I do at my best. I am also betting that there are some health benefits as well.

For me, Sunday has become my day of rest. Years ago, I thought, “not working on Sunday, what a waste of time.” One day I realized, even God rested on the seventh day. Since we are made in His image, we should do the same. We stay busy with full home inspection schedules most of the time, even Saturdays. So Sunday is my down day to spend going to church, being with my family and doing things other than business. Even during the week now, I have learned to take short breaks and do something other than work in our business.

At first, I felt guilty, like I was being lazy. But after a while, I began to see that with small breaks from work, when I return to work I am much more focused and productive. After taking a break, the quantity and quality of work are also improved.

The saying that “all work and no play makes Jack a dull boy” now rings true. So my advice to you is if you want to improve your business and work, take some down time. Your business, family and health will thank you.

 


Realtor Top Criticisms of Home Inspection Companies – Part 3

March 18, 2010

Realtor Top Criticisms of Home Inspection Companies – Part 3

#3.) Inspectors Don’t Put Things Back The Way They Found Them

There is a very simple fix for the third top criticism Realtors have of home inspectors. Leave it like you found it. If it was closed, close it when you are done. If it was locked, lock it when you leave. If it was on, leave it on when you leave. You get the idea.

When I was a boy scout leader, we had a motto, “Leave No Trace”. When we went camping, is was our belief that after we left, there should be no trace, no sign that we had ever been there. As a professional home inspector, I continue to keep this value and believe that all inspectors should as well. Except for perhaps a business card left on the kitchen counter, I work hard to make sure that everything is left the way I found it, including the HVAC thermostat.

As home inspectors, we inspect all kinds of homes. Some are vacant and many still have current owners living in them. When we disturb things in someones home, we should put them back the way we found them. Having a stranger go through your home and leave things out of place can leave a feeling of violation that “someone has been in my house”. Not a comfortable feeling for anyone.

Personally, I live on a small farm and have also enjoyed hunting and fishing on the properties of many others. There is always one important rule. If the gate is open, leave it open. If the gate is closed, leave it closed. Although the homes we inspect are not likely to let out any livestock, we may be guilty of letting someone’s dog or cat out. More to the point, it is important for professional home inspectors to leave people homes exactly as they were before we performed our inspection.

So, it is simple. Home Inspectors should “Leave No Trace”. Proof that an inspector was there should only be evident by the home inspection report and perhaps a business card left behind. This is an easy criticism of home inspectors that should be easy to overcome.

Remember, be professional and “Leave No Trace”.

David Selman
Advanced Professional Inspector
Lic.# 10299
FHA/HUD # F537
Septic License #113423
Phone: 469-371-3228

Email: david@SelmanHomeInspections.com

“Accurate Investment Protection You Can Trust”

Websites: Dallas Home Inspection | Fort Worth Home Inspection



Realtor Top Criticisms of Home Inspection Companies – Part 1

March 12, 2010

Realtor Top Criticisms of Home Inspection Companies – Part 1

As a North Texas Home Inspection Company, I am always working to improve how my company performs home inspections and building relationships with Realtors and clients through education about home inspections. And, I believe that eliminating (or at least minimizing) the top criticisms Realtors and clients have of home inspectors is good for my industry, the real estate industry, good marketing and valuable for educating Realtors about the nature of home inspections. In this multi-part blog post, I will be listing the top criticisms many home inspectors hear from Realtors and their clients and discussing how my home inspection company overcomes these criticisms.

#1.) Embellishment of Home Inspection Findings

While I have not had this problem reported as a criticism of my home inspection reports, I have heard it about other home inspectors from agents and clients who have had inspections from other companies. Based on my reading of a few other home inspectors reports, embellishment of deficiencies in home inspections come from two or three kinds of inspections. First, there are new home inspectors who lack experience in report writing and will dwell on simple deficiencies far to long, sometime just trying to show what they know. Second, there are home inspection reports on properties in very, very good condition where the inspector could find very little to report. In these cases, the inspector would sometimes make simple, minor deficiencies sound like the house was going to fall down if it is not corrected. Third, there are the home inspectors that Realtors refer to as “alarmists”. These inspectors tend to expound and exaggerate the reported problem (deficiency) to the point that the home inspection report scares or “alarms” the client and, sometimes, causes the client to back out of the deal.

The solution in my opinion is to simply and accurately state what the deficiency is according the the Standards of Practice and whether or not it is a safety hazard. Then tell ( in writing ) what field of home improvement specialist the inspector would recommend to evaluate and repair the problem. For the most important items, I will often also quote the SOP (Standards of Practice) to describe the problem. Rarely if every, do my inspections quote “building codes”.

In my view, it is important that home inspectors report problems effectively but in a non-alarmist manner. Almost every common problem a home inspector can report has a viable solution. Every minor crack in the drywall is not evidence of a serious structural or foundation problem and should not be embellished.  Good home inspectors know the difference between the severities of defects they find. Even when a serious defect is reported, it should be reported concisely, to the point and in simple to understand terms for both the Realtor and the client.

In Part 2 of “Realtor Top Criticisms of Home Inspection Companies, I will be writing about the dreaded subject of “Home Inspection Fees”. Until next time, God Bless.

David Selman
Advanced Professional Inspector
Lic.# 10299
FHA/HUD # F537
Septic License #113423
Phone: 469-371-3228

Email: david@SelmanHomeInspections.com

“Accurate Investment Protection You Can Trust”

Websites: Dallas Home Inspection | Fort Worth Home Inspection


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